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Suboxone Drug Rehab Doctors in Charleston, SC

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Richard Kellett, MD

8626 Dorchester Rd Suite 101

North Charleston, SC 29420 USA| Map
(843) 225-7746

Buprenorphine Opioid Treatment Doctors in Charleston, South Carolina.


Constance Alexander, M.D.

Barrier Island Psychiatry
1954 Ashley River Road Suite H
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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James Allen, M.D.

Dept. of Psychiatry, Med. Univ. of S.C.
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Stephen Baker, M.D.

114 Ashley Avenue
Charleston, SC 29401 USA

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Kelly Barth, D.O.

67 President Street
PO Box 250861
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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David Beckert, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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David Beckert, M.D.

67 President Street
Msc 861
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Sarah Book, M.D.

Center for Drug and Alcohol Programs
29 Leinbach Drive Building C Unit 2&3
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Calvin Bosman, M.D.

Compass Carolina Healthcare
1483 Tobias Gadson Boulevard, Ste. 107
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Jeffrey Buncher, M.D.

1124 Sam Rattenburg Boulevard
Suite I
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Julie Burke, M.D.

125 Doughty Street
MSC 861, Suite190
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Taylor Callinan

1124 Sam Rittenberg
Suite 1
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Eduardo Cifuentes, M.D.

1483 Tobias Gadson Boulevard
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Heather Dawson, M.D.

6518-B Dorchester Road
Charleston, SC 29418 USA

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Maggie Eisenhower Pierson, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Nicholas Fisher

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Nicole Franklin, M.D.

MUSC
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Anoren Huchingson, M.D.

MUSC
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Michael Huggins, M.D.

Charleston Addiction Medicine, LLC
2175 Ashley Phosphate Rd.
Charleston, SC 29405 USA

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Cathleen Kouvolo, M.D.

171 Ashley Avenue
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Sarah Kuhn, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Todd Magro, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Todd Magro, M.D.

1620 Ashley River Rd.
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Robert Malcolm, Jr., M.D.

4-N CDAP Psychiatry, M.U.S.C.
67 President Street, Rm 459
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Temeia Martin, M.D.

1721 Ashley Hall Road
Unit 5-R
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Stephen McLeod-Bryant, M.D.

Medical University of South Carolina
67 President Street, MSC 861
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Darlene Moak, M.D.

St. Andrews Psychiatric Services
669 St. Andrews Boulevard
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Jason Molinaro, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Ralph Piening, III, M.D.

1124 Sam Rittenberg Boulevard
Suite 1
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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Terri Randall, M .D.

171 Ashley Avenue
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Allan Rashford, M.D.

2 Race Street
Charleston, SC 29403 USA

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Christian Reusche, M.D.

757 Johnnie Dodds Blvd
Suite 100
Charleston, SC 29464 USA
www.ebbtoflow.com/

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John Roberts, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29420 USA

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Samuel Rosen, M.D.

198 Rutledge Avenue
Suite 8
Charleston, SC 29403 USA

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Samuel Rosen, M.D.

2093 Henry Tecklenburg Boulevard
Suite 303
Charleston, SC 29414 USA

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Emily Rountree, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Jonathan Snipes, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29414 USA

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Nicole Stocking, M.D.

67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Bryan Tolliver, M.D. Ph.D.

Medical University of South Carolina
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425 USA

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Tresha Ward, M.D.

Ashley River Family Physicians
2270 Ashley Crossing Drive Suite 165
Charleston, SC 29414 USA

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Kathryn Wolf

1124 Sam Rittenberg Boulevard
Suite 1
Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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What is Buprenorphine?
 Buprenorphine is an FDA approved opioid addiction treatment. Currently Subutex® & Suboxone® are the only Buprenorphine medications approved by the FDA. Buprenorphine itself is opioid itself, but the maximal effects are less than other more dangerous opioid agonist like methadone and herion. By producing enough agonist, individuals taking Buprenophine that have become addicted to other opioids are able to discontinue abuse with minimized withdrawl side-effects. In 1965, K.W. Bentley discovered the class of compounds synthesized from an alkaloid of thebaine, the opium poppy plant, known as Papaver somniferum. Among these semi-synthetic compounds is Buprenorphine - the first in a series of opioid agonists. Many were more than 1000 times more effective than the analgesic, morphine. In the 1980s, Reckitt & Colman, today known as Reckitt Benckiser, introduced Buprenorphine hydrochloride for sale. Buprenorphine, an analgesic, was first made in sublingual tablets of 0.2 mg (Temgesic). It was also made as an injectable of 0.3 mg/ml (Buprenex). Read More...

What is Suboxone®?
 Suboxone® is the first narcotic drug available for prescription from a doctor's office for use in the treatment of opioid dependence under the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 or DATA 2000. The primary active ingredient in Suboxone is Buprenorphine, which itself is a partial opioid agonist. This means the the opioid effects and withdrawal symptoms from Buprenorphine are less than other full opioid agonists such as heroin, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, and others. Suboxone, taken as sublingual tablets or "under the tongue", has been shown to help in suppressing opioid withdrawal symptoms, decrease illicit opioid cravings and use, and under the correct supervision can help with overcoming an opioid dependence. Suboxone comes in 2mg and 8mg sizes of sublingual tablet form. Suboxone contains naloxone, which blocks the effects of medicines and drugs like methadone, morphine, and heroin. This is added to prevent people from injecting Suboxone and improper use of the medication. Injecting naloxone can cause withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone is the most commonly prescribed medication and given to patients during the maintenance phase of treatment. Subutex is typically given during the first couple of treatment. Because Suboxone has a lower potential for overdose and abuse, unlike methadone, Certified Doctors are able to prescribe take home supplies of Suboxone in certain circumstances. Read More...

The Benefits of Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction
 Since 1949, the 12-step program developed by Alcoholics Anonymous has been the dominant way we think about facing and fighting addiction. Many people have successfully used this community- and willpower-based approach to escaping addiction. However, countless others have tried it, and relapsed. With the powerful hold that opioid addiction has on so many people in America, it’s time to face addiction with an equally powerful—and proven—method: medication-assisted treatment (or MAT). MAT is the practice of using drugs like suboxone and subutex to help people dependent on painkillers gradually ease themselves off their addiction. While these treatments have been available for many years, there is a stigma to relying on these medications to help fight addiction rather than the traditional willpower and community approach of a 12-step program. Here are five benefits to using an MAT approach to ending opioid dependency:
1. MAT is proven to have better results than conventional programs alone.
2. MAT stops withdrawal symptoms so patients can live a normal life.
3. MAT is flexible, allowing medication to be taken at home or in a clinic
4. MAT offers multiple drugs (like suboxone and buprenorphine) to find what works for you
5. It’s easy to find an MAT/suboxone provider near you Read More...

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