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Suboxone Drug Rehab Doctors in Grand Rapids, MI

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Peter Farago, MD Bright Heart Health

400 Renaissance Center

Detroit, MI 48243 USA| Map
(855) 339-7189

No waitlists, no travel, no traffic, and no hassles.

Bright Heart Health is the first online opioid use disorder treatment program via telemedicine. Individuals meet with our medical staff and counselors via video conferencing – not in a clinic or office. We provide individuals with the highest level of care.

We prescribe and monitor medications (e.g., Suboxone) that allow individuals to stop abusing opioids without experiencing powerful drug cravings or severe withdrawal symptoms. Our counselors meet with individuals online via telemedicine, and help identify and develop strategies to deal with the issues and disorders that may have contributed to or been impacted by opioid abuse.

At Bright Heart Health, we will help prepare you to live a healthier and more productive life, free from of opioid addiction.

Buprenorphine Opioid Treatment Doctors in Grand Rapids, Michigan.


Bruce Baker, M.D.

West Brook Recovery Center, LLC
3210 Eagle Run Drive, NE Suite 200
Grand Rapids, MI 49525 USA

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Russel Brubaker, M.D.

1005 Evergreen SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49507 USA

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John Budnick, D.O.

Turning Point
72 Sheldon Boulevard S.E.
Grand Rapids, MI 49503 USA

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Tariq Faridi, M.D.

3330 Claystone South East
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

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Ricardo Garza, M.D.

2000 Burton Street, SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49506 USA

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Stanislaus Gunadi

1055 Medical Park Drive
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

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Stanislaus Gunadi

300 68th Street, SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49501 USA

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James Hudson, M.D.

Rehab Pros
350 Lafayette SE Suite 500
Grand Rapids, MI 49503 USA

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Keith Javery, D.O.

710 Kenmoor Avenue, SE
Suite 200
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

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Daryl Lawrence-Friedl, D.O.

877 Forest Hll
Suite C
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

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David Mazur, D.O.

833 Kenmoor SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

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Norman Miller, M.D.

Subs.& Acute Detoxification Program
300 68th Street, SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49548 USA

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Aaron Plattner, M.D.

Pine Rest Christian Mental Health
300 68th Street Southeast
Grand Rapids, MI 49548-6995 USA

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Ramin Rahimi, D.O.

4955 East Beltline
Suite A
Grand Rapids, MI 49525 USA

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Michael Septer

6735 Cascade Road
Unit #300
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

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Wayne Smith, D.O.

West Brook Recovery Center, LLC
3210 Eagle Run Drive, NE, Suite 200
Grand Rapids, MI 49525 USA

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David Sova, D.O.

4081 Cascad Road, SE
Suite A
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

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Bruce Springer, M.D.

Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Servic
300 68th Street, SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49548 USA

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Sheila VanLowe-Prince

847 Parchment SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

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Pamela Zuidgeest, M.D.

West Brook Recovery Center, LLC
3210 Eagle Run Drive, NE Suite 200
Grand Rapids, MI 49525 USA

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What is Buprenorphine?
 Buprenorphine is an FDA approved opioid addiction treatment. Currently Subutex® & Suboxone® are the only Buprenorphine medications approved by the FDA. Buprenorphine itself is opioid itself, but the maximal effects are less than other more dangerous opioid agonist like methadone and herion. By producing enough agonist, individuals taking Buprenophine that have become addicted to other opioids are able to discontinue abuse with minimized withdrawl side-effects. In 1965, K.W. Bentley discovered the class of compounds synthesized from an alkaloid of thebaine, the opium poppy plant, known as Papaver somniferum. Among these semi-synthetic compounds is Buprenorphine - the first in a series of opioid agonists. Many were more than 1000 times more effective than the analgesic, morphine. In the 1980s, Reckitt & Colman, today known as Reckitt Benckiser, introduced Buprenorphine hydrochloride for sale. Buprenorphine, an analgesic, was first made in sublingual tablets of 0.2 mg (Temgesic). It was also made as an injectable of 0.3 mg/ml (Buprenex). Read More...

What is Suboxone®?
 Suboxone® is the first narcotic drug available for prescription from a doctor's office for use in the treatment of opioid dependence under the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 or DATA 2000. The primary active ingredient in Suboxone is Buprenorphine, which itself is a partial opioid agonist. This means the the opioid effects and withdrawal symptoms from Buprenorphine are less than other full opioid agonists such as heroin, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, and others. Suboxone, taken as sublingual tablets or "under the tongue", has been shown to help in suppressing opioid withdrawal symptoms, decrease illicit opioid cravings and use, and under the correct supervision can help with overcoming an opioid dependence. Suboxone comes in 2mg and 8mg sizes of sublingual tablet form. Suboxone contains naloxone, which blocks the effects of medicines and drugs like methadone, morphine, and heroin. This is added to prevent people from injecting Suboxone and improper use of the medication. Injecting naloxone can cause withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone is the most commonly prescribed medication and given to patients during the maintenance phase of treatment. Subutex is typically given during the first couple of treatment. Because Suboxone has a lower potential for overdose and abuse, unlike methadone, Certified Doctors are able to prescribe take home supplies of Suboxone in certain circumstances. Read More...

The Benefits of Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction
 Since 1949, the 12-step program developed by Alcoholics Anonymous has been the dominant way we think about facing and fighting addiction. Many people have successfully used this community- and willpower-based approach to escaping addiction. However, countless others have tried it, and relapsed. With the powerful hold that opioid addiction has on so many people in America, it’s time to face addiction with an equally powerful—and proven—method: medication-assisted treatment (or MAT). MAT is the practice of using drugs like suboxone and subutex to help people dependent on painkillers gradually ease themselves off their addiction. While these treatments have been available for many years, there is a stigma to relying on these medications to help fight addiction rather than the traditional willpower and community approach of a 12-step program. Here are five benefits to using an MAT approach to ending opioid dependency:
1. MAT is proven to have better results than conventional programs alone.
2. MAT stops withdrawal symptoms so patients can live a normal life.
3. MAT is flexible, allowing medication to be taken at home or in a clinic
4. MAT offers multiple drugs (like suboxone and buprenorphine) to find what works for you
5. It’s easy to find an MAT/suboxone provider near you Read More...

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